Google Cuts Service to Wireless Firms Over Privacy Fears

Google Cuts Service to Wireless Firms Over Privacy Fears

Google Cuts Service to Wireless Firms Over Privacy Fears

Following earth-shattering fines and substantial reputational damage, some of the world’s biggest tech corporations appear to be busy polishing up their act, in efforts to avoid further embarrassment.

As privacy regulators continue to flex their muscles with landmark legal actions, is it possible that lessons are actually being learned, resulting in preventative measures, rather than damage limitation after a data privacy violation has been exposed?

Fearing data privacy issues, Google cuts some Android phone data for wireless carriers

Alphabet Inc's Google has shut down a service it provided to wireless carriers globally that showed them weak spots in their network coverage, people familiar with the matter told Reuters, because of Google's concerns that sharing data from users of its Android phone system might attract the scrutiny of users and regulators.

The withdrawal of the service, which has not been previously reported, has disappointed wireless carriers that used the data as part of their decision-making process on where to extend or upgrade their coverage. Even though the data were anonymous and the sharing of it has become commonplace, Google’s move illustrates how concerned the company has become about drawing attention amid a heightened focus in much of the world on data privacy.

Google's Mobile Network Insights service, which had launched in March 2017, was essentially a map showing carriers signal strengths and connection speeds they were delivering in each area.

The service was provided free to carriers and vendors that helped them manage operations. The data came from devices running Google’s Android operating system, which is on about 75% of the world's smartphones, making it a valuable resource for the industry.

It used data only from users who had opted into sharing location history and usage and diagnostics with Google. The data were aggregated, meaning they did not explicitly link any information to any individual phone user. It included data relating to a carrier's own service and that of competitors, which were not identified by name.

Nevertheless, Google shut down the service in April due to concerns about data privacy, four people with direct knowledge of the matter told Reuters. Some of them said secondary reasons likely included challenges ensuring data quality and connectivity upgrades among carriers being slow to materialize.

Google spokeswoman Victoria Keough confirmed the move but declined to elaborate, saying only that changing "product priorities" were behind it. Google’s notice to carriers when it shut down the service did not specify a reason, two of the four people told Reuters.

"We worked on a program to help mobile partners improve their networks through aggregated and anonymized performance metrics," Keough said. "We remain committed to improving network performance across our apps and services for users."

Sources and Full Story: Reuters