Posts tagged GDPR
GDPR EXPLAINED: The 6 Legal grounds for Processing Personal Data LAWFULLY

For many businesses, compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has proven to be a bigger challenge than first anticipated, with much of the confusion caused by the complexities of the 99 articles and 173 recitals that make up the 261-page document.

This article, although not definitive, provides some clarity for companies seeking to establish appropriate legal grounds for the processing of personal data.

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Federal privacy law: Hearings continue as CCPA and GDPR discussed

Once again, data privacy was hot on the agenda this week, as the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs met on Tuesday for the first of two privacy-related hearings scheduled this week.

As Congress continues to move at a snail’s pace towards the creation of a federal consumer privacy law, critics complain that, yet again, old ground is being covered, judging by the testimonies offered by some senators.

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Ireland’s GDPR regulator assists Congress with federal privacy law

Last week we posted on how Congress is being advised by various industry experts, as lawmakers’ wrestle with the task of codifying a federal consumer privacy law. However, as we reported, there are concerns that some external “advice” could potentially come from industry-funded lobbyists, whose job is to influence in favor of the big tech players.

Whether you support the introduction of a federal privacy law or prefer to see state-level consumer privacy legislation, you might find it comforting to know that at least one advisor to Capitol Hill has no such ulterior motives for providing assistance.

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FTC holds 2-day hearing on federal consumer legislation

Last week, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) held its twelfth Hearing on Competition and Consumer Protection. The theme of the two-day hearing focused on the FTC’s approach to consumer privacy.

In this post we highlight some of the main points discussed during the hearing, what was agreed and disagreed, and consider whether new privacy laws such as the CCPA and the GDPR have any part to play in the formulation of new federal privacy legislation.

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Federal Privacy Law: Congress seeks answers on location tracking consent

At a Committee on the Judiciary hearing on March 12, lawmakers were seeking answers from witnesses on how companies profit from users' personal data. They also want to know whether consumers should be given more choice in the matter, as Congress considers a future federal privacy law.

One of the highlights of the hearing was when Google’s senior privacy counsel, Will DeVries crossed swords with Senator Josh Hawley, R-Mo, over whether users are fully aware of the extent of Google’s use of location tracking.

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House Hearing dismisses GDPR and CCPA as models for Federal Data Privacy

As lawmakers consider the way forward for federal data privacy legislation, the sense of urgency appears to be ramping up, as states like California and Colorado prepare to launch home-grown consumer privacy laws in 2020.

Moreover, the rise in data breaches and privacy violations by big tech companies is refocusing the conversation in government circles, on the need to protect the personal information of U.S. citizens. Rather ironic, when you consider who knows more about individuals than any other organization.

Nonetheless, Congress continues to discuss and debate how to protect the population from corporate misuse of data and increasing privacy violations, with federal laws and enforcement.

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Could the EU’s Data Privacy Laws leave the U.S. languishing in the dust?

Last week’s headline news of a €50 million ($57 million) fine imposed on GOOGLE LLC confirms yet again that the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is not to be messed with.

The French data protection authority, CNIL, found that Google had violated GDPR rules by misleading users into “consenting” to allowing their personal information to be used for advertising purposes, when setting up new accounts. It remains to be seen whether the search giant’s appeal against the punitive fine, on January 25, is likely to hold water.

In other parts of the European Union, similar investigations are ongoing against Facebook and Instagram.

The case against Google demonstrates the increasingly prominent role that the EU intends to play in the policing the use of personal information by major companies and organizations online. It seems fair to say the U.S. is definitely lagging behind Europe on this front.

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